The Beard Is Back

I made it back from Edinburgh safe and sound, although I’m jet-lagged, and have airline sore throat to deal with. Because I forgot to take shaving cream with me on the trip, I have a two week bear going, and you know what that means… Cletus is comin’ back, and he might stick around for a little while!

6 thoughts on “The Beard Is Back”

  1. I also enjoyed the presentation. In the light of your advice to use body(font: 76%….} I’d like to know if you have anything good or anything at all to say about the way IE6 handles
    Tools->Internet Options->Accessibility->Format documents using my own stylesheet.
    which I have a very low opinion of: in fact it seems to be almost useless.
    What I’d expect from this when the user plugs in their own stylesheet is one of 2 behaviours:
    1. ALL programmer specified styles in stylesheets are ignored. As if they didn’t exist. The only styles applied are the ones in the user’s stylesheet. (maybe even ignore inline styles).
    OR
    2. where the user has specified a setting and the programmer has specified a setting, the user’s setting wins. And where the user hasn’t specified a setting, the one in the programmer’s stylesheet is used. This would make sense: eg we’re told to put “font: 67%” in the body style so the user’s stylesheet can reset the size globally just by specifying a size in body{…} in their own stylesheet.
    What do we actually get: where there is a conflict, the programmer’s setting wins. So if I set body {font: 67%} and the user finds that too small and uses their own stylesheet with body{font:200%} their setting is ignored: mine wins. This seems to be almost insultingly bad from IE6.
    I’m not sure about Firefox (I think you have to download extensions before you can plug in your own stylesheet).
    Do you have any thoughts on that?

  2. You need to use !important to override the font size. This is because of the cascade. See the spec
    User properties without !important are first in the cascade, so the author stylesheet overrides them. Using !important puts them after the author stylesheet.

  3. Thanks I didn’t know that. But would there ever be a situation where a user didn’t want their style settings to override the author’s? And if not, why not just say they override the author’s by default?

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